What Is Stock Photography

Stock photography is simply photos taken “on spec”. This means the photographer takes pictures of various objects, people, or situations, and sells them after the pictures have been taken. They are not on a specific photography assignment, instead they are taking photos of subjects they’d like to take pictures of.

Stock photos are primarily used in printed advertisements, brochures, magazines, and websites, though there are many other ways stock pictures can be used.

Stock photography is licensed in several different ways. The two most popular are Rights Managed, and Royalty Free Stock Photography.

Rights Managed photography is the use of stock photos that are licensed for a specific, limited time and purpose. If an advertiser for instance, needed a stock photo for one specific ad campaign, they could license a photo for that specific use. And they’d be limited to using the photo only for that campaign. They’d also be charged based on the size of the ad campaign they intended to use the stock photo for.

If they wanted to use the same photo again, they’d have to pay another fee. And that fee might be different, if the campaign use and sizes are different. These recurring fees are called royalties, and with rights managed stock photography they can be quite hefty. Ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars for the limited use of one photograph.

Royalty free stock photography allows you to pay a license fee once, then use the photo multiple times. There are usually limitations on this form of stock photography, however the restrictions are not nearly as narrow as rights managed photography is. A designer or advertiser could license one photo for instance, and use it in hundreds of different ad campaigns, without incurring additional fees. In other words: No royalty fees need to be paid.

Generally royalty free stock photos can be licensed for as little as $50 up to several hundred dollars depending on the licensing source and rights given.

One of the most popular forms of photography for small and web based businesses, is royalty free micro stock photography. This is a variation on the royalty free model, but it’s referred to as “micro stock” because designers and advertisers pay just a dollar or two per image license.

This type of stock photography has become quite popular with website owners particularly, because it’s a very inexpensive way to get top quality photos for use on their websites. Quality stock photos can be licensed for as little as $1 in smaller, web friendly sizes. And prices go up to about $3 or $5 for larger, print quality photo sizes.

Since these photos are royalty free, designers can use them multiple times for that one time low cost. Be sure to check the licensing restrictions though. Royalty free does not automatically mean “public domain” or “copyright free”, and each micro stock photography site has their own particular use restrictions on the photos you license.

Some Macro Digital Photography Basics

Macro photography is underused by many amateur photographers. Professional photographer use macro photography to take extremely high quality macro photos that impress their viewers. Here are some facts about such macro digital photos.

We have all seen macro digital photos even if some of us did not realize that they were such. The two most common macro digital photos objects are flowers and insects. But macro photography is not limited to these objects. Creative photographers take macro photos of objects that you would never think of and create astonishing digital photos. For example taking a macro photo of a simple screw that is half way screwed in a piece of wood can be an amazing digital photo if taken using the right techniques of lighting and macro photography.

So what is macro photography? There are many definitions that can be used. The most intuitive one is simple: digital photos that are taken from very close to the objects. Another definition is digital photos that present objects in real life sizes when printed on a 4X6 paper. Yet another definition extends this to a real life size (1:1 ratio) or better (i.e. bigger than in real life).

Professional photographers use special equipment that was designed specifically for macro photography. Special lenses, lens tube extenders, flash units such as ring flashes and more are used. There is no doubt that such equipment can help specially in scenes that are hard to photograph. But even the cheapest digital pocket camera is capable of pretty good macro photography if only used right by the photographer.

Practically all digital cameras can be put in a macro mode”. Usually this mode is illustrated as a flower icon” (probably because flowers are the most common object for macro photography). When you put the camera in a macro mode the camera optimizes its settings for the best macro digital photo. If your camera allows manual control of some of its settings (like aperture and focus) you can improve the quality of the photos further more.

In macro mode the digital camera will set a wider aperture in order to achieve a narrower depth of field. This helps create a macro photo that is focused on a very close item with its background blurry. The camera will also optimize its focusing algorithms to focusing on a very close object. In fact in macro mode it will be hard to make the camera focus on objects in normal or infinite distances.

Some cameras also set the flash intensity to lower since the object is close less flash light energy is needed to light up the scene. Macro photography lighting is a complicated issue due to the close proximity of the object to the lens. A right angle, source and intensity of the flash are hard to achieve. For that reason it is always better to take macro digital photos in a highly lit environment like in daylight.

In conclusion like most other photography techniques it is important to use macro photography in the right scenarios. It also takes a lot of practice to achieve high quality macro digital photos. For example if you want to get a macro photo of a bee on a flower you need to learn how to lock the camera focus press the shutter button half way while all the settings are set and wait for that bee to show up. Also take as many photos as you can so hopefully one of them will be the perfect one you were aiming at. Go out and start taking macro photos to practice your skills. It is a good idea not to limit yourself to flowers and insects, anything can be a good object, a nail, a screw or a piece of candy.

Making A Beginning In Nude Photography

Nude photography suffers from the stigmatization of easily accessible pornography, and many people don’t distinguish between the two. Unlike pornography, though, which seeks to eroticize the human form and titillate the viewer, nude photography celebrates the human body in all its forms. Done correctly, nude photography can engender an appreciation of the human form.

As a beginning photographer with a desire to do nude photography, start first with studying the nude photography of some great photographers, such as Edward Weston and Alfred Stieglitz. Studying their nude photography technique will go a long way toward helping you define what you want to do with your nude photography.

For beginners in nude photography, it might be best to start more simply with still life as you hone your photography skills of lighting, focus and exposure. Portraiture will help hone skills of posing models and building a rapport with your subjects. Joining a class on drawing nudes will help you overcome initial embarrassment before hiring a nude photography model.

When you get ready to approach someone about modeling for your nude photography, make sure you have a portfolio ready. If you don’t have any nude photography experience yet, include the best of your still lifes and portraits.

Make sure with a signed “model release” that your nude photography model is over 18. The release can also stipulate other agreed-upon issues, such as publishing limitations and whether to release the model’s name. Make certain your nude photography doesn’t violate city ordinances.

Ensure that your models feel secure. Have a chaperone or assistant or suggest that they bring a friend with them to your nude photography sessions. If they feel comfortable, you’ll get better photos.

You may be expecting to fill your nude photography portfolio with beautiful, young models; consider broadening your range in order to make nude photography as respectable as portraiture.

The Evolution Of Photography The Beginning

Photography! Who could have thought that we would now be able to take pictures through a digital camera and transfer to a computer and change the colors or any of the attributes of an image or a photograph? Digital cameras are sharper and provide high quality pictures that can be used over multiple mediums.

Sir John Herschel is a man who invented the term ‘Photography’ in 1839.

This was also the year when the process of Photography was unveiled to the public.

How did photography really evolve? Well! It is the bi-product of laws of physics and compounds of chemistry. The evolution of photography is a completely scientific process starting with the use of optics in the 1830’s.

The dark room or Camera Obscura existed some four hundred years back, while cameras were being used since the 11th century and yet photography did not come into public use before the 1830’s.

There were different observations made by several people that finally led to putting together of all the missing pieces and this also announced the advent of photography. Some of those important observations are:

* In the 15th century, Robert Boyle found out that silver chloride turned dark when exposed to air and not light.

* In the early 1800’s Angelo Sala observed that when silver nitrate powder is kept in the sun for long, it turns black.

* Around 1727, Johann Heinrich Schulze made a discovery regarding colors. There were some liquids that changed their colors when they were exposed to light.

* Thomas Wedgwood conducted some experiments in the early 19th century. He had captured images but could make the images permanent.

* The first ever successful production of a photograph emerged in the June-July of 1827 by Joseph Nicphore Nipce. The material used for this became hard when exposed to light for almost 8 hrs. Nipce went into a partnership with Louis Daguerre on 4th Jan, 1829 to work further on this.

Four years later in 1833, Nipce died and Daguerre continued alone to discover how to develop photographic plates. Invention of the photographic plates meant that the exposure time was reduced considerably, from 8 hrs to 30 minutes. He also made another important observation and the conclusion drawn was that immersing an image in salt would make it permanent.

Paul Delaroche, a leading French scholar made a report on this and the French government bought the rights in July 1839, and made it public on 19th Aug, 1839. This process was named Daguerreotype after Louis Daguerre.

The Daguerreotype process was expensive and one time affair. At that time there were no negatives available and hence the original photograph could not be reproduced. The only way of getting two copies was by using two cameras side by side. This led to the growing need of finding a way to copy pictures and finally led to the invention of the Calotype process by William Henry Fox Talbot.

Although the Daguerreotype was superior to the Calotype, the latter was able to provide multiple positive prints of a single picture in 1840. This was the calling of a new dawn!